We all heard about the recent high-profile Vancouver aquarium’s beluga debate. The argument there was “is it justified to hold large aquatic mammals – such as whales – in captivity, for the greater purpose of conservation education?”

We can generalize this even further to “Can some form of exploitation be beneficial to conservation?”. Now, thinking about food, we consider whether “sustainable seafood” programs like Oceanwise and Marine Stewardship Council help consumers make more sustainable choices.

While it’s easy to understand that we don’t want to eat fish that have unstable populations, it’s less clear that buying so-called sustainable seafood is preferable to buying no seafood at all.

 

 

GUESTS

  • Jenice Yu | Fresh Ideas Start Here (F.I.S.H), a family business selling sustainable seafood in Vancouver | eatfish.ca
  • Dr. Isabelle Côté | Professor of Marine Ecology at SFU | The Marine Ecology Lab
  • Cory Lagasse | Manager of hydro-acoustics | Pacific Salmon Commission | psc.org

Credit: Oceanwise